Micklefield Parish Council

Serving the people of Micklefield

Coat of Arms

Clerk & RFO: Joanne Hebden
6 Churchville Avenue
Micklefield, Leeds LS25 4AS

Tel: 0113 2875829

  • Visit our Skate Park

  • The Micklefield Phoenix

    The Micklefield Phoenix

  • Entering the village from the North

    Entering the village from the North

History of the village:

The name, Micklefield, is derived from the Old English 'Micelfield', meaning 'Great Field'. The village is listed in a Royal Charter of 963 A.D., which makes Micklefield one of a very special set of Yorkshire townships with a recorded history older than the Doomsday Survey of 1086.

The small linear settlement of Old Micklefield was probably settled by the English around 620 A.D. Prior to this it lay in the British Kingdom of Elmet. Crop marks in the area, the proximity of the Roman Road and the enigmatic earthworks at Castle Hills suggest earlier settlement in the parish at least to Romano-British times, and possibly earlier.

The main road through the village was probably an ancient north/south trade route, though from Roman times it was superseded by the Ridge Road, which now forms the western boundary of the village. The main road regained its importance during the Tudor Era and became the Great North Road turnpike in 1741.

The Blands Arms public house (an important symbol of our village history) was an overnight stop for Scots cattle drovers taking their stock to market in London. The 'Scotsman' building where they rested still stands at the rear of the pub. The pub also honours the Blands family, Lords of the Manor from 1600 to the 1920s and sole landowners in Micklefield from 1750 to 1830.

The Parish Council:

The Parish Council was established in 1894. The village has changed substantially since then, but the Parish Council continues to work to make Micklefield a better place to live, work and visit. Our website includes a wealth of information about how we conduct business and what we do.

Find local groups and businesses in our community directory. Use the search or browse the site to find whatever you are looking for. If you can't find what you want or would like to recommend any improvements to our website then please contact us.

All Parish Council activities are governed by law, from time, location and number of meetings, to how its finances are managed and what we can spend money on. Whenever it makes a decision to do something, particularly if the decision involves spending money, the Parish Council must be sure that there is a law that supports this. If there isn't, then the Parish Council hasn't acted legally. If the Parish Council is not undertaking work that you think it should be, it might be because it does not have the legal power to do so.

Notice of all Parish Council meetings (ordinary and extraordinary), Committee meetings and meetings of the Trustee of Micklefield Recreation Ground Charity is posted in each village notice board at least three clear days before the meeting, as required by law. Though not a legal requirement, the Parish Council also posts an agenda of the business to be transacted at the meeting. Any other business of the Council, including legally required documents such as vacancy notices and audit notices, is also posted in the notice boards, so checking them regularly can help you keep up with Parish Council activities.

Latest News

Parish Council Vacancies

Posted: Tue, 09 Feb 2021 13:10 by Joanne Hebden

Micklefield Parish Council has two vacancies. Please see the notice below for further information. Additional information about the role of councillor can also be found in the publication 'It Take's All Sorts' on the 'About the Council' page of the website, following the 'The Council' link, then 'Councillors'.

Road Closure - Church Lane junction with Ridge Road (A656)

Posted: Tue, 09 Feb 2021 10:22 by Joanne Hebden

Leeds City Council plans to close the junction of Church Lane and Ridge Road (A656) from 7.30pm on Friday 19 February to 6am on Monday 22 February. Please see the attached documents for more information.

Census

Posted: Mon, 08 Feb 2021 11:05 by Joanne Hebden

The census is coming. By taking part, you can help to inform decisions on services that shape your community, such as schools, doctors' surgeries and bike lanes. It's important you fill in your census questionnaire because the information you share affects the life of every single person living in England and Wales. Because these things matter to us all, everyone needs to complete the census. Do not worry, your information is protected by law. That means government officials dealing with payments or services you receive cannot see it. Census Day is Sunday 21 March. You can fill yours in online as soon as you get your access code in the post. If your household circumstances change on Census Day, you can let The Office for National Statistics (ONS) know. More »

The ONS aims to make things as easy as possible for everyone, but if you need help taking part in the census, there's a wide range of support services available. You can request support for yourself, or someone else, including: ● guidance and help in many languages and formats ● a paper version of the questionnaire, if you prefer ● accessible census guidance, for example, in braille.

We want to make sure the census informs us about all communities so that public services meet everyone's needs. Ethnicity, religion and national identity The ONS will ask you about your ethnicity, religion and national identity. You can identify with your chosen background, religion and national identity. If you cannot find the option you require, you can use the search-as-you-type function. Alternatively, you can request a paper questionnaire. That will allow to you write in the identity that you feel most accurately represents you. Sexual orientation and gender identity Census 2021 asks voluntary questions about sexual orientation and gender identity for the first time. This is to give us more accurate information on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations. It will help organisations combat any inequalities these groups face and show where services are needed. The ONS will only ask people aged 16 years and over these voluntary questions. If you do not feel comfortable identifying on the same form as the rest of your household, you can request an individual census questionnaire and answer separately.

For the first time, the census will ask if you've served in the UK Armed Forces. The information you share will help us understand the numbers, locations and ages of our armed forces community. This will show where resources and services are needed to make sure those who have served, and their families, are treated fairly. You only need to answer this question if you are aged 16 years or above.

There is a help area on the census website. It covers everything from who to include on the questionnaire to how to answer each question. If you cannot find what you need there, there's a dedicated contact centre where census staff will be on hand to give help over the phone, in a web chat or on social media. If you need help, you can visit www.census.gov.uk where there's a wide range of support services available. » Less